Volume 138, Issue 2 p. 219-224
CLINICAL ARTICLE

Postpartum contraceptive choices among women attending a well-baby clinic in Ghana

Emmanuel S.K. Morhe

Corresponding Author

Emmanuel S.K. Morhe

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana

Correspondence

Emmanuel S.K. Morhe, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.

Email: [email protected]

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Frank Ankobea

Frank Ankobea

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana

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Gerald O. Asubonteng

Gerald O. Asubonteng

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana

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Baafuor Opoku

Baafuor Opoku

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana

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Cornelius A. Turpin

Cornelius A. Turpin

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana

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Vanessa K. Dalton

Vanessa K. Dalton

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA

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First published: 17 May 2017
Citations: 4

Abstract

Objective

To assess postpartum contraceptive choices among women attending a well-baby clinic in Ghana.

Methods

From April 1 to May 31, 2011, a descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted among women who attended the well-baby clinic of Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, at 6–24 months after delivery. Participants were consecutively recruited and interviewed using semi-structured questionnaires. Data were collected on demographics, exposure to family planning counseling, message content, and postpartum contraceptive choices. Differences between the profiles of women who did or did not take up postpartum family planning were assessed.

Results

Of the 200 women enrolled, 44 (22.0%) wanted no more children and the last pregnancy was unintended among 88 (44.0%). In all, 110 (55.0%) women took up postpartum contraception, with the calendar method (n=57; 51.8%) and injectable contraceptives (n=22; 20.0%) cited as popular choices. Family planning counseling was received at the prenatal clinic by 47 (23.5%) women, with 12 (6.0%) given written referrals on the postnatal ward. More previous contraceptive users than previous non-users chose long-acting or permanent postpartum methods (P<0.001).

Conclusion

Inadequate postpartum family planning counseling and referrals during maternity care were recorded, suggesting that a comprehensive educational intervention is required to improve uptake.