Volume 111, Issue 12 p. 1464-1467

Prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium in early pregnancy and relationship between its presence and pregnancy outcome

Pippa Oakeshott

Pippa Oakeshott

Community Health Sciences, St George's Hospital Medical School, London, UK

Search for more papers by this author
Phillip Hay

Phillip Hay

Department of Genitourinary Medicine, St George's Hospital Medical School, London, UK

Search for more papers by this author
David Taylor-Robinson

David Taylor-Robinson

Division of Medicine, Imperial College London, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK

Search for more papers by this author
Sima Hay

Sima Hay

Community Health Sciences, St George's Hospital Medical School, London, UK

Search for more papers by this author
Birthe Dohn

Birthe Dohn

Statens Serum Institut, Mycoplasma Laboratory, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark

Search for more papers by this author
Sally Kerry

Sally Kerry

Community Health Sciences, St George's Hospital Medical School, London, UK

Search for more papers by this author
Jorgen S. Jensen

Jorgen S. Jensen

Statens Serum Institut, Mycoplasma Laboratory, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark

Search for more papers by this author
First published: 22 November 2004
Citations: 62
Dr P. Oakeshott, Community Health Sciences, St George's Hospital Medical School, London, SW17 ORE, UK.

Abstract

Mycoplasma genitalium is associated with cervicitis and pelvic inflammatory disease but little is known about its role in pregnancy. We investigated the prevalence of M. genitalium by polymerase chain reaction assay on urine specimens from 1216 pregnant women (mean age 31years) presenting before 10 weeks of gestation in 32 general practices. The prevalence of M. genitalium was 0.7% (6/915, 95% CI 0.1–1.2). It was more common in women aged <20 years, women of Afro-Caribbean or black African ethnic origin, women in social classes 3–5 and single women. Only one woman with M. genitalium infection miscarried, and none of those followed up to term had a preterm birth, although the numbers were small. The low prevalence of M. genitalium infection suggests it is unlikely to be an important risk factor in adverse pregnancy outcome in healthy women in the community.