Volume 122, Issue 2 p. 118-123
Clinical articles

Results of a community-based cervical cancer screening pilot project using human papillomavirus self-sampling in Kampala, Uganda

Gina S. Ogilvie

Corresponding Author

Gina S. Ogilvie

Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

Corresponding author at: BC Centre for Disease Control, 655 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4R4, Canada. Tel.: + 1 604 707 5600; fax: + 1 604 707 5604.Search for more papers by this author
Sheona Mitchell

Sheona Mitchell

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

Search for more papers by this author
Musa Sekikubo

Musa Sekikubo

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda

Search for more papers by this author
Christine Biryabarema

Christine Biryabarema

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda

Search for more papers by this author
Josaphat Byamugisha

Josaphat Byamugisha

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda

Search for more papers by this author
Jose Jeronimo

Jose Jeronimo

Program for Appropriate Technology in Health, Seattle, USA

Search for more papers by this author
Dianne Miller

Dianne Miller

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

Search for more papers by this author
Malcolm Steinberg

Malcolm Steinberg

Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada

Search for more papers by this author
Deborah M. Money

Deborah M. Money

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

Search for more papers by this author
First published: 02 June 2013
Citations: 46

Abstract

Objective

To examine the feasibility of a community-based screening program using human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sampling in a low-income country with a high burden of cervical cancer.

Methods

A pilot study was conducted among 205 women aged 30–69 years in the Kisenyi district of Kampala, Uganda, from September 5 to October 30, 2011. Women were invited to provide a self-collected specimen for high-risk oncogenic HPV testing by outreach workers at their homes and places of gathering in their community. Specimens were tested for HPV, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. Women who tested positive for HPV were referred for colposcopy, biopsy, and treatment at a regional hospital.

Results

Of the 199 women who provided a specimen, 35 (17.6%) tested positive for HPV. The outreach workers were able to provide results to 30 women (85.7%). In all, 26 (74.3%) of the women infected with HPV attended their colposcopy appointments and 4 (11.4%) women were diagnosed with grade 3 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

Conclusion

Self-collection of samples for community-based HPV testing was an acceptable option; most women who tested positive attended for definitive treatment. Self-sampling could potentially allow for effective recruitment to screening programs in limited-resource settings.