Volume 118, Issue S2 p. S134-S140
Economic consequences

Public hospital costs of treatment of abortion complications in Nigeria

Janie Benson

Corresponding Author

Janie Benson

Ipas, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

* Corresponding author: Janie Benson, Vice President, Research and Evaluation, Ipas, P.O. Box 9990, Chapel Hill, NC 27515, USA. Tel.: +1 919 960 5994Search for more papers by this author
Mathew Okoh

Mathew Okoh

Ipas, Abuja, Nigeria

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Keris KrennHrubec

Keris KrennHrubec

Ipas, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

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Maribel A. Mañibo Lazzarino

Maribel A. Mañibo Lazzarino

lpas, Durham, NC, USA

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Heidi Bart Johnston

Heidi Bart Johnston

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland

University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland

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First published: 22 August 2012
Citations: 13

Abstract

Unsafe abortion is a significant contributor to maternal mortality in Nigeria, and treatment of postabortion complications drains public healthcare resources. Provider estimates of medications, supplies, and staff time spent in 17 public hospitals were used to estimate the per-case and annual costs of postabortion care (PAC) provision in Ogun and Lagos states and the Federal Capital Territory. PAC with treatment of moderate complications (US $112) cost 60% more per case than simple PAC (US $70). In cases needing simple PAC, treatment with dilation and curettage (D&C, US $80) cost 18% more per case than manual vacuum aspiration (US $68). Annually, all public hospitals in these 3 states spend US $807 442 on PAC. This cost could be reduced by shifting service provision to an outpatient basis, allowing service provision by midwives, and abandoning the use of D&C. Availability of safe, legal abortion would further decrease cost and reduce preventable deaths from unsafe abortion.