Volume 118, Issue S2 p. S127-S133
Economic consequences

The health system cost of postabortion care in Ethiopia

Michael Vlassoff

Corresponding Author

Michael Vlassoff

Guttmacher Institute, New York, NY, USA

* Corresponding author: Michael Vlassoff, Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, USA. Tel.: +1 212 248 1111Search for more papers by this author
Tamara Fetters

Tamara Fetters

Ipas, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

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Solomon Kumbi

Solomon Kumbi

Ethiopian Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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Susheela Singh

Susheela Singh

Guttmacher Institute, New York, NY, USA

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First published: 22 August 2012
Citations: 26

Abstract

To address the knowledge gap that exists in costing unsafe abortion in Ethiopia, estimates were derived of the cost to the health system of providing postabortion care (PAC), based on research conducted in 2008. Fourteen public and private health facilities were selected, representing 3 levels of health care. Cost information on drugs, supplies, material, personnel time, and out-of-pocket expenses was collected using an ingredients approach. Sensitivity analysis was used to determine the most likely range of costs. The average direct cost per client, across 5 types of abortion complications, was US $36.21. The annual direct cost nationally ranged from US $6.5 to US $8.9 million. Including indirect costs and satisfying all demand increased the annual national cost to US $47 million. PAC consumes a large portion of the total expenditure in reproductive health in Ethiopia. Investing more resources in family planning programs to prevent unwanted pregnancies would be cost-beneficial to the health system.